Weblog Archive >  2003 >  January Previous/Next


Scripting News, the weblog started in 1997 that bootstrapped the blogging revolution.
 

Permanent link to archive for Friday, January 31, 2003. Friday, January 31, 2003

DaveNet: Never underestimate Steve CasePermanent link to this item in the archive.

Business Week: "The next round of globalization is sending upscale jobs offshore. They include basic research, chip design, engineering -- even financial analysis." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Russell Beattie: Qwerty Phone Keypad. Interesting idea. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Wired: "Ex-Apple programmer Jim Speth is about to release new open-source software that lets a select group of users share files over the Internet."  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Scott Knaster sends word that the Space Shuttle will be visible in the Bay Area as it's landing tomorrow. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

1/31/00 was a sunny day, in Davos. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

David Heller: HTML's Time is Over. Let's Move OnPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Mark Pilgrim: "I have no idea what Iím going to do with myself."  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Scoble asks an important question. "Patient A has a troupe of 20 people with her, and at least five stay around the clock to pray for her. Patient B only has two people with her, and they don't stay around the clock. If something goes wrong with both patients at the same time, and there's only one surgeon available, which one gets the surgery done first?" There's no doubt that Patient A gets the help. Having spent a lot of time in hospitals in the last year, this is well-known among families. It's why I spent so much time in the hospital with my father. If the nurses and doctors get to know you, your friend or relative gets better care. No doubt about it.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Adam's family Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named curry.gifExcellent. I just watched a movie of Adam's family playing Monopoly from his payload channel. Adam is my friend, but I've never met his wife or daughter. Until now. He's a lucky guy. Two beautiful women who love him. Nice. If you use an enclosure-aware aggregator or reader and leave it running overnight you'll get the Monopoly movie and I can see from reading the RSS that we'll get a tour of their lake tomorrow.

Interesting that they speak both Dutch and English at Adam's house.

January 31 Permanent link to this item in the archive.

How time flies. Tomorrow is the beginning of the second month of the year. My hippie uncle, the guy who lives in Jamaica, is ten years older than me. He says it keeps getting worse. I know. Oy.

A picture named abeSimpson.gifWhen you're young life creeps at a glacial pace. "Oh I wish adulthood would finally come," sighs the young person. "Youth is wasted on the young," whines the old fart.

An image of an old geezer sitting in a rocking chair on a front porch appears, and I understand what he's saying. "Rush, rush, rush, that's all young people do," says the old geezer (in an Abe Simpson-like voice). But there's wisdom in the rants of a silly old man. First the old guy's body doesn't rush so well anymore. All the aches and pains. They quiet down if he just sits and watches. Young people don't have those pains. He doesn't remember. But time is rushing by fast enough. Old folk may know how to stop and savor a moment, just hold it, and appreciate it for what it is, without thinking of the future (which old people don't have) or the past (there's more of that all the time).

I'm not really old yet, but I'm not young anymore. I'm one of those inbetweeners. Not just starting, but not finished. January 31. What a weird thought.


Permanent link to archive for Thursday, January 30, 2003. Thursday, January 30, 2003

DaveNet: Meet The Peking Duck.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

New RSS Howto: How to support enclosures in aggregatorsPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Don Park: "In Korea, secret PIN is often used to protect credit cards, cash cards, and bank accounts. Unfortunately, most people don't treat PIN as a personal secret and not only share it with others but routinely asks for it." 

Just got an email from a reporter saying we underhype RSS. I seriously had not considered that possibility. No sarcasm. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "All of AOL Time Warner's high-flying initiatives of the last two years have amounted to a $100 billion mistake." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

The Economist profiles the FCC's Michael Powell. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I signed up for the Stanford spectrum policy conference, March 1-2. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Cory Doctorow: "The city of San Diego recently dropped $23,000 on a Googlebox." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Timothy Appnel: The Next Generation of TrackBackPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Welcome to the first annual Nude Blog AwardsPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Juice is an "alternate browser with built-in support for Google's search API." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Blogistan: "I'm no fan of the National Review, but this Jonah Goldberg image cracked me up."  

2/3/95: "SuperBowl beer commercials are aimed at people who are drunk." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Davos: "This year's hot ticket was apparently an invitation-only Super Bowl party, hosted by Bill and Chelsea Clinton." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named king.gifOn this day in 2000 I blogged Sports Day at Davos. It's also the king of Jordan's birthday. He gave a great speech. And on this day in 1998, Frontier 5.0 shipped. It was the first version that ran on both Macintosh and Windows. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

BBC: "A total of 27 new sites will be opened at Welcome Break service stations, while 36 Hilton hotels will offer hotspots in their lobbies. Business travellers will also be able to log on at Heathrow, Gatwick, Stansted and Aberdeen airports." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

0xDECAFBAD: "If I've heard of you, can I list you as a friend? If I've emailed you once or twice?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jake Savin: "Now for a little code clean-up, some docs and a beta release." Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Wednesday, January 29, 2003. Wednesday, January 29, 2003

Peking Duck: "I've been trying to access The New York Times and the Washington Post all morning, only to get the Cannot Find Server message for both sites." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Tripod now has weblogsPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Great stuff tonight on the Salon blogs. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

News.Com is supporting guids in their RSS feeds. Yes. We've got forward motion. Bing bing bing.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Here's a clue why Steve Case stepped down when he did. $99 billion lost in 2002. Oy oy oy. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Sjoerd Visscher: "I now include the referrers using XInclude." I've always wanted an element in HTML. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jake Savin: "I'm working on a new backup/restore feature for Radio UserLand, and have hit a bit of a snag." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

For sale: ZDNet Tech Update staffPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Joi Ito: "If you need to get inebriated to 'bond' you've got a psychological problem." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named nuke.gifGeorge Bush, US President, often says how serious going to war is, but I'm not sure he really gets it. Sure we're sending our young boys to die. That's relatively easy. But we still live in a nuclear age, and every time we go to war, that ups the odds that today is the last day for the human race (and everything else on earth). Ooops. Old people die too. Makes you stop and think. Either Bush thinks a war with Iraq isn't likely to lead to a nuclear exchange (why?) or he welcomes the idea (oh geez). Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Some people think that not going to war is a prescription for nuclear war. Sorry for not representing that pov in the above. It is a possibility I suppose. Another possibility is using the goodwill we've gotten with Hussein's neighbors to solve some other problem that saves lives instead of killing people. Wouldn't that blow people's minds? But don't pay attention to me, when it comes to war I'm usually the one arguing against it. I guess I was wrong about Kosovo, for example. I thought it was another Vietnam, for sure. It wasn't. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Ever wonder how viruses get their names? It looks pretty random. The reporters need a handle for each virus. So why don't we use a system like the one they use for hurricanes and typhoons? First a woman's name, then a man's name, starting with A, then B, round and round we go. It's good because we don't let the virus writer add a name to the common vocabulary. Why should they get rewarded for being jerks, or worse. What do you think? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Lawrence Lee: "Most virus companies seem to follow the CARO virus naming convention developed in 1991 by Fridrik Skulason, Alan Solomon and Vesselin Bontchev." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

To Tom Matrullo who wonders what good RSS is if it just shovels the same old crap he reads in newspapers. Tom, t's better than that. Much. RSS creates a level playing field that's open to all. Amateurs and pros, young and old, rich and poor, the homeless, the uninsured and people with AIDS, you name it -- they all can slug it out for readers in the same venue. If you subscribe to Scripting News, today you've already heard about a new peer-to-peer network, you've learned a little math, and read an amusing Glenn Fleishman piece about skiing in Montana (if you clicked) and heard that Dubya is borrowing a few lies (oops lines) from Teddy Roosevelt. And it's not even 7AM. Sure the NY Times, BBC, News.Com, etc are all worth reading. But now you're getting more variety, and they're getting competition, which are good things, imho. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Another way to look at it. A old style journalist interviews a couple dozen people for a week, and then produces an article that you can read in five minutes. He includes a few quotes. That's one way to do it. Another way is DIY or Do It Yourself. A news event. I think to myself "Who would know what this means?" I go to their weblog. See what they think. Link to them from my weblog. Then I think of another person. I go to their weblog. Etc etc. This is good because it routes around the soundbite-creating and dumbing-it-down processes. Who cares if the expert said it in a clever way (actually I do care). But what I really want is to know what they really think, not what the editors of the pub want me to hear.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

The Open Content Network is a "collaborative effort to help deliver large, freely-downloadable content using peer-to-peer technology." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jason DeFillippo: "I am blogholio!"  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Scott Rosenberg illustrates the difference between mean and median in Bush's hype about tax cuts. "This average is a convenient fiction; it's a statistic that exists only because the enormous benefits accruing to the dividend-owning super-rich skew the 'average' -- and camouflage the fact that the cuts most middle class taxpayers will receive under Bush's proposal are piddling." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

If you've written an article about RSS recently, please suggest a link in the section of the RSS directory. I included JD Lasica's article because, imho, RSS is not just for geeks anymore. But it is still for geeks too. I'm working this morning on the developer evangelism I promised yesterday.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

RSS Feeds for the Fusebox.Org Forums. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Glenn Fleishman: "Yeah, well, none of us have jobs!" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named tr.gifBTW, I was impressed with Bush's talk about war in Iraq. Very inspirational. As Teddy Roosevelt said, there are some things you have to go to war over. I bet his speech writers read a lot of TR. Anyway I was not impressed with what he said about health insurance. I don't believe he has a plan to get every American health insurance, although he said that was his goal.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jon Udell: "A lot of this stuff is much worse than it needs to be." Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Tuesday, January 28, 2003. Tuesday, January 28, 2003

Only Scripting News asks "What will you do while Dubya gives his speech tonight?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jing Jing, home of Spicy Noodles, has a website. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I've booked my next trip east. I'll be in NY betw Feb 5-7, then Boston betw Feb 8-11, and back in NY betw Feb 12-16. The beginning and ending dates are fixed, but the time betw Boston and NY is flexible. I'm looking into getting a classroom for an evening session open to all Boston-area bloggers to talk about whatever we want to talk about. Here's an idea of how these meetings work. BTW, the round trip air fare betw SFO and JFK was $340; that's non-stop on a major airline.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Michael Winser is one of the developers of Microsoft's Web browser. He was a frequent contributor here during the browser wars of the 90s. What he says about performance of HTML tables is authoritative. "There's only one solution: change the problem," he says. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

One of the more interesting ideas in Cosmos is that we might live inside a black hole. It's one way to grapple with the finiteness of the universe. "Where does the universe end?" asks the student. "Is there a wall, and if so, what's on the other side?" Well, if you lived inside a black hole you might ask the same questions. Exactly the same questions. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Reuters: "Kazaa said Tuesday that it had countersued film and music companies seeking to shut it down, alleging antitrust violations and overzealous copyright protection." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

News.Com: "Opera Software says the future of its Mac browser is clouded now that Apple is producing its own." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Douglas Bowman's markover for Weblogs.Com. Very nice! Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Simon Willison cracks the nut as well. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

8:30AM Pacific: I applied Bowman's design to Weblogs.Com. The text is a little small, but otherwise it's great. It's much faster at refreshing than the table-based design.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Wired: "Anyone can contribute an article to the Wikipedia." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Count the errors in this BBC article, starting with the title which does not describe what the article contains. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: Worm Hits Microsoft, Which Ignored Own AdvicePermanent link to this item in the archive.

Adam explains how his weblog became part of his TV show.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Lunch in Switzerland Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Lance Knobel: "As I write this, my friends in Davos will be making their way up the mountain for the annual highlight of the meeting: the Schatzalp lunch. The lunch is on the 'snow terrace' of the Schatzalp Hotel, which has the faded grandeur you'd expect of the former sanitorium and setting of Mann's Magic Mountain. Sadly, it looks like today there won't be much of a view."

This gives me goosebumps. The venue of the Schatzalp lunch is a slice of heaven on earth. Photo.

In 2000, the year I attended, the dotcom bubble was still very much inflated, probably at its peak. I was one of a handful of people from the Land Of Dotcom, so the investment bankers wanted to hear what I thought about this or that or the something else. For me that peaked at the Schatzalp. Neither will probably ever happen again. But what a grand day that was! Oh man.

RSS enclosures Permanent link to this item in the archive.

My next tutorial for RSS developers is going to be about enclosures. These are do-it-yourself things, with the goal of helping developers of weblog tools, aggregators and news readers support the feature. So far I've done tutorials for comments and guids. The next is enclosures.

A picture named robbGirl.gifEnclosures are easy to support, but we need an example to work with to bootstrap it. It should update at least once a day, with a new enclosure that we can download in the middle of the night. So I asked Adam Curry to help out here, and he agreed. So here's his RSS feed, subscribable, for testing enclosures:

Adam Curry: Welcome to the Payload Channel.

I'm going to use this opportunity to write a new browser-based enclosure function for Radio that notifies you in a module in the Status Center when new enclosures have arrived.

CSS, a black hole Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Reading through the first batch of email this morning. People responding to the query about a CSS version of Weblogs.Com are asking why I want to nuke the table. Performance. I explained it. If it's not possible to get that kind of layout with CSS, just say so. But this is not a religious thing. Believe me. I explained that too. Makes me wonder if people bothered to read my request before writing (long) responses.

Bravo. Gary Taylor understood what I was asking for. It's probably not cross-browser though.

I think I give up on CSS. It's a black hole. Andreas Helstrom suggested splitting it up into multiple pages. That's probably the most workable solution that works in every browser without support headaches into the next millennium. Onward!

Wait a minute. It looks like Dave Polaschek nailed it.


Permanent link to archive for Monday, January 27, 2003. Monday, January 27, 2003

Matt Croydon: "If a redesign happens and everyone is reading via RSS, did a redesign happen?" 

Jeneane Sessum: "How to quit smoking? It's time." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named nyTaxi.gifEd Cone: "Jim Capo reports seeing a personalized NC license plate reading Blog.Man here in Guilford County." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Cory Doctorow: "iCommune, the iTunes sharing/streaming plugin that Apple nastygrammed out of existence a couple weeks ago is back, though it's not clear if the author is doing this in defiance of Apple or not." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Adam Curry: "I see the combination of RSS enclosures being used to hand off a url to a BitTorrent file, that automatically joins that file's network, downloads all relevant bits into the right places and notifies the subscriber of the new goodies." 

News.Com: "AOL is testing a new instant-chat robot that answers questions from AIM users about weather and stocks." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A question for CSS design gurus. What's the best you can do with a table that has three columns like the one on Weblogs.Com. Let's see an example. I'd like the page to look good and load fast. Postscript: No one seems to understand -- I want to do weblogs.com without a table. Column 1 is the number, column 2 is the name of the weblog. Column 3 is the time it last updated. Look at the page.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

People say "But it's a table, that's what tables are for." I understand and usually agree -- but in this case -- the table is so long that some other way of displaying it might be much more usable. It's something of a scaling issue, not a religious or philosophical one.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named doc.gifI started to spec the chat-room-for-blog-post system that Russ and others described yesterday, and realized I don't know enough about IM. Can an app other than an IM client create a chat room? I don't know. I imagine it depends on which IM system one is using.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Business 2.0: "Get ready for moblogging." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

MacWhispers: "Apple is near a beta release of their long-rumored professional word processing application." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

It really annoyed me that the list behind Weblogs.Com was imperfectly sorted. I thought this was because pings were coming in while the table was being sorted, but when I fixed it so this couldn't happen, it didn't get any better. That was a few months ago. Today I took another look and understood the problem more clearly. The code that produces the list doesn't even try to sort the list. It just happens to be close-to-sorted because another thread needed it sorted and did the work. But an indeterminate amount of time can pass between the two threads being called. So I changed the code in Radio Community Server to cache the table, and to lock a semaphore during the sort. The net result is that there's a little more lag between a ping and appearance on the page, but it's now perfectly sorted (unless it's not). Praise Murphy! Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Be careful what you promise.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Wired: "A voracious worm that spread over the weekend appears to be under control. Meanwhile, conspiracy fans are having a field day trying to guess who released it and why." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: Crime Is Soaring in CyberspacePermanent link to this item in the archive.

SF Chronicle: "Hundreds of police with riot gear, squad cars and helicopters were no match for larger numbers of troublemakers in scattered locations along International Boulevard who set fires, smashed windows and destroyed property, including a McDonald's restaurant that was ransacked and partially burned." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Gnome-Girl: "Survived the Oakland raids and stampedes last night. Fires everywhere, outraged fans go ballistic but I lived to tell about it." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Three years ago today I arrived in Davos. I attended a session on the size of the universe. "It was in this session that jetlag caught up with me. I was trying to figure out what time it was back home, and fell asleep doing that simple task. I woke myself up by reminding myself how exciting this place is." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I remember when Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Old people are cursed by memories. So much bullshit begins with "I remember when."

We can't help it, so forgive us. We do think there are common themes of life that we all go through.

Think about it this way. We don't all have the same experience in puberty, but then again, we do. At the end, you're ready to have sex and make babies. There's lots of stuff ahead of you like that. Really.

IM and weblogs Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Lots of great stuff in the thread on Instant Messaging and weblogs. Russ Lipton, as usual kicks big ass. Don Park too. Russ says each item on a weblog could form a chatroom for a few hours or days after it's posted. Keep a transcript. Allow the blogger the usual controls to keep spam, abusive posts and off-topic stuff off. Don says blogging is IM Slow.


Permanent link to archive for Sunday, January 26, 2003. Sunday, January 26, 2003

What's the connection between IM and weblogs? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named chris.gifWatched the SuperBowl at Scoble's. Hoopty Loops. Rating the commercials. Coming up with new words, and revitalizing old ones. Chris Pirillo is blogging the party. Gnome Girl brought the jello. "It's the Super Bowel party," says Scoble. Best commercials so far: Pepsi Twist, FedEx, Monster.Com, Sierra Mist, Budweiser, Reebok, Sony. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Dino Morelli hit a deal-stopper working on a schema for RSS 2.0. The problem is that each can have zero or more elements. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "Newspapers are engaged in technological one-upmanship over 'AstroTurf' letters to the editor that look like authentic grass-roots responses from readers but are not." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named tivo.gifIf you have a TiVO or workalike, record today's SuperBowl, even if you're going to a party; for no other reason than to be able to watch the commercials in private and repeat as necessary. I should probably send a bill to some Hollywood exec for this message.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Economist: "The best way to foster creativity in the digital age is to overhaul current copyright laws." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

John Rhodes: "Why not use RSS feeds to keep customers aware of new products and services?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: Scooters for TechnophilesPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Google Weblog: "In SearchKing v Google the judge has denied SearchKing's request for preliminary injuction. In other words, SearchKing asked for their PageRank to be put back to where it was while the trial was being held, and the judge said no." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Smokers only Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named butt.gifAs a former smoker I would congregate with other smokers, and this is one of the things I miss the most now that I don't smoke. The places smokers congregate tend to be good places for conversation that bridges social and age differences because smoking cuts across all the denominators -- young and old, male and female, professional and working class. All are represented in the ranks of smokers.

I remember a conversation I had on the "smoking deck" of a resort I go to. Smoking is prohibited everywhere but there. I was talking with a man in his early 20s. We were talking about nothing at all, just one of the heaviest subjects between young and old (I was in my early 40s at the time).

The question was, why do you, Dave, think you're smarter than me?

Or put it another way -- hey old dude -- you don't know shit.

Which, of course, is mostly what young people have to say to old people. (Or so it seems.)

So is it true, am I smarter than the young guy?

Now, of course, I don't know the answer. I couldn't unless there was some objective measure of smartness. So all I can do is have an opinion. But that doesn't mean I can't use the scientific method to form the opinion. So I asked my young friend some questions.

How old are you now? 22. Do you know more than when you were 18. Oh sure! No comparison, I was really stupid then. How about at 15? I was just a kid, I didn't know anything.

(I move in for the kill.)

Do you think learning stops at 22?

Answer: Of course it doesn't. You learn things in your late 20s that you can't imagine in your early 20s. And the early 30s have their lessons, as do the mid 30s and the late 30s (oh boy!) and then the early 40s. And some of the learning is pegged to other people's experiences. Like when one of your parents dies. Or a child goes to college. Or things out of your control (bypass surgery).

Ask a really old person about this. One of the sweetest things about life is that you can always learn, right up to the moment you die. And that's part of what's most enjoyable about being human. For some reason, if we can find the pure learning, it's a joyful thing, whether or not we ever get to use what we learn.

BTW, my young companion basically said that learning does stop at 22. I wish I had his phone number or email address, he's probably about 27 now. I'd like to ask the obvious follow-up question.


Permanent link to archive for Saturday, January 25, 2003. Saturday, January 25, 2003

Google Village: "Who are you optimizing your site for?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

East Broadway Ron notices that spam sometimes tells a story in the subjects, when viewed in sequence. I've noticed this too! Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Would a meta-blog formed from the top sites of the day be interesting? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

SQL virus reports Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named graph.gif6:30AM Pacific. Heard a report on NPR that some kind of Internet-wide denial of service attack is underway. They quote Microsoft saying it's serious. If you have more information, esp Web pages I can point to, please post a comment on my Radio weblog. Thanks.

Reports: CNN, BBC, Slashdot, Beta News, Google, AP, Reuters.

Lawrence Lee: "Here's a chart from the Internet Traffic Report with global packet loss for the past 24 hours."

Freedom.Org: "Quick fix is to firewall port 1434/UDP traffic, and reboot the affected SQL servers."

Slashdot: "If you run Microsoft SQL Server, make sure the public Internet can't access it."

Beta News: "The attack used a buffer overflow to execute code on a vulnerable SQL Server, causing that system to randomly seek out other computers to infect and in the process consume massive amounts of bandwidth."

Jason Levine: "The worm generated an average of 2,815 packets a second, or roughly 170,000 packets a minute."

My bet with Martin Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Observation. In 2003, when we want to, we can beat the NY Times, on a technical subject. Their report just appeared in their RSS feed, for the home page (so they thought it was an important story), but -- they don't have their own report, it's from AP. Presumably they will have a full Times-authored story in the Sunday edition.

In contrast, when I checked at 6:30AM Pacific, Slashdot had the whole thing, cause and cure, and while I asked for and got lots more links from Scripting News readers, Slashdot already had the story from the main angle.

One wonders why the AP report couldn't also include the cure, it's one sentence, sure it wouldn't mean anything to most people, but to the people who need the information, it could make a huge difference. The Internet is a set of interdependencies. We all depend on each other, never can you see that more clearly than when a virus attack is underway.

Anyway, good job, World Wide Web, and hats off to Slashdot. Now, if I'm going to win the bet with Martin in 2007 (which I plan to), we're going to need to be that good not just in technology, but in everything.

Earlier links Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Anne Bradstreet: "If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant: if we did not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome."

Doc: "I ride the Asymptote to Oblivion."

An excellent Jamie Zawinski rant on Linux usability.

Wired: "For a fee of $10 to $13, the service, called Live Phish, features specially designed cover art and provides soundboard-quality downloadable recordings of Phish concerts less than 48 hours after a performance."

Rahul Dave: "With comments you don't care about identity, just that the person is a real person, not a spam bot."

UserLand's mail server is down. No mail. Interesting feeling. It must be in the water (or air). My friend Cory Doctorow is having mail problems too.

Carl Sagan Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I got new glasses. Interesting experience. The prescription is better at short distances, like for reading books and computer screens, but not as good at long distance as my old glasses. I figure the glitches will fix themselves. We'll see.

A picture named sagan.gifIn the meantime, reading is easier, so I'm doing more of that and less TV-watching. I'm reading three books at the same time now. One of them is Cosmos by Carl Sagan. It has very small type. I can read it. Nice. One of the things I've learned is that the universe started with just hydrogen and a very small amount of helium. Everything else comes from stars, which are factories for more complex elements, in addition to the source of all our energy and the cosmic rays that make genes mutate and therefore are responsible for evolution.

Without stars there would be no silicon (the stuff our planet is made from), or carbon (the stuff we're made from). Sagan's writing is so great. He has a way of making all my problems seem so unimportant. The last time I read his book he was still alive. He died at a young age of cancer. What a sweet man he was, so smart, so generous.

America's medical system Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Doctor to a young man, just 27 years old. "I have bad news, good news, and bad news."

First the bad news. You have a terminal disease. Without treatment, you will die.

Now the good news. There's a drug that will hold back the disease. Unless there's a cure, you will have to take it for the rest of your life.

Now the bad news. The drug costs $700 per month. Your insurance will cover it. But if you get fired or laid off, eventually you will have to pay for it out of your own pocket, or die.

This is a real story.


Permanent link to archive for Friday, January 24, 2003. Friday, January 24, 2003

Evangelism: "Guids are not just for geeks anymore." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Here's a page that ranks RSS feeds by the amount of new bits they deliver to Radio users, both today and over time. I haven't looked at that page in a long time. Surprised more people aren't getting news from the NY Times and BBC. Perhaps that's because they deliver their news in spurts at the end of the day. Each spurt per user only counts for one. You score higher if you deliver news steadily.  

Phillip Torrone got a phone call today from Woz.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Elwyn Jenkins: "Have you got your Google Word?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Peter Van Dijck: Introduction to XFMLPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Today is the first birthday of the XML coffee mug! Permanent link to this item in the archive.

News.Com: Font maker plans open-source typefacePermanent link to this item in the archive.

Sounds like Uncle Ito's session at Davos went well.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Popdex "offers the ability to host TrackBack threads." 

Berklee: "I'm curious about identity theft as well." Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Thursday, January 23, 2003. Thursday, January 23, 2003

Evangelism: "RSS 2.0 has a neat feature that allows an item to link to comments about that item. Content tools and aggregators can support this feature, allowing people to comment directly from the aggregator." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Fredrik Lundh's Python RSS reader supports the comments feature described above. Excellent.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "The Senate voted today to bar deployment of a Pentagon project to search for terrorists by scanning information in Internet mail and in the commercial databases of health, financial and travel companies here and abroad." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named ito-san.gifOur man in Davos, Joi Ito, is nervous. Here's a word of advice. If you aren't nervous you won't be any good. Butterflies are a good sign Ito-san.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

News.Com: "The market for XML-based content-lifecycle products -- software and services that allow content to be easily reused in a number of formats -- will grow tenfold to $11.6 billion in annual revenue by 2008, according to a report released Thursday." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

JD Lasica: "Instead of the hunt and peck of Web surfing, you can download or buy a small program that turns your computer into a voracious media hub, letting you snag headlines and news updates as if you were commanding the anchor desk at CNN." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

JD does something extremely cool, on his weblog he provides full transcripts of the interviews he did for the piece. Much more interesting. Very nice. Someday all reporters will do this. Hey maybe they'll skip writing the polished piece, esp when the article isn't appearing in print. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Let's have a weblog that covers identity theft from the point of view of an honest person wanting to be as safe as possible. I read an article somewhere that common criminals are turning from violent mugging to identity theft. Less messy, less work, less risk, higher yields. We also need a weblog about how to get good health care in the US. The weblog should be a collaboration between users and medical professionals. I got excellent responses to yesterday's rant. I hope we can get some of this energy to flow through the public Web. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named hambrecht.gifYesterday, talking with Bill Hambrecht, I asked how they do finance in the movie business, where they routinely raise tens, even hundreds of millions of dollars for highly speculative projects. I remarked that software can't raise that kind of money these days, really never has, yet the western economy is built on software more and more (that's why identity theft is such a pervasive problem). He said that the distribution system is where the money comes from. The movie theaters! Why? Because they need a flow of new products, or their industry dies. So what's the analogy in software? The big software companies. Microsoft. Adobe. Macromedia. Oracle. IBM. Apple. SAP. BEA. Network Associates. Of course. That's the system we all figured we'd be part of in the early 80s. That's the system we started to build. We lost our way somewhere. We've been getting the money from civil employee pension funds and university endowments, which have little stake in the success of our industry, and are highly risk averse. That's why the venture capital industry seems so crazy when technologists look at it. They're backed in a contradictory way. Everything was fine as long as they were delivering obscene returns like clockwork. Hit a glitch, the whole thing falls apart. More to think about. I'll blog it all.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named kim.gifAfter my meeting with Bill Hambrecht I went to see my old friend Dave Jacobs, who worked at Macromedia and Marimba. The conversation turned to Marimba, where I was friends with the founders and their backers as the company was rolling out. They have $20 million in cash. After the meeting with Hambrecht, I knew what to do. Kim is still their best sales person. Of course. So use the money to create products for Kim to sell. Make deals with every geek in the Valley. Spread the money around. Buy up rights. When you get a winner, put Chairman Kim on the road. Make money. Do it again. A new product every quarter. Simple. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Mary Jo: "Microsoft may find itself on the wrong side of the sneaker-wearing partner in Boies, Schiller & Flexner." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named rice.gifCondoleezza Rice: "Countries that decide to disarm lead inspectors to weapons and production sites, answer questions before they are asked, state publicly and often the intention to disarm and urge their citizens to cooperate." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I find it striking that the meeting of Middle East foreign ministers, to avoid war in Iraq, is being held in Turkey, not in Davos. What a difference a few years makes. When I was there in 2000 you'd stumble across hallway meetings between high-level US, Israeli and Palestinian reps, and the show closed with beautiful ceremony with Yassir Arafat and Shimon Peres. "Peace is hard work," Peres said.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Lance's report, not from Davos 2003. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "Until the Golden Gate Bridge and Bay Bridge eclipsed ferry traffic in the 30's, the building was the crossroads of San Francisco." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Seth Dillingham: "If I was a spammer, I'd think this was a gift!" Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Wednesday, January 22, 2003. Wednesday, January 22, 2003

Picture of Hillary RosenNews.Com: RIAA chief to step down. "She was featured in the most recent issue of Wired magazine as 'The Most Hated Name in Music' -- a bold statement in an industry notoriously rife with avaricious record producers and label executives." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Had a really interesting meeting this afternoon with famous investment banker and venture capitalist Bill Hambrecht. I'm interested in meeting more people who were part of the early Silicon Valley, before the dotcom boom. Hambrecht was the initial investor in Adobe, in 1982. He tells lots of Adobe stories. Fascinating stuff. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

PC Mag reviews Apple's new Web browser. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Mark Pilgrim: Parsing RSS At All CostsPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Interesting discussion about validating RSS; happy ending. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Paolo: "In Italy nobody pays prescription drugs." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named gg.fig.gifBrian Buck: "Like Dave, before any of this happened to me, I was completely clueless." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Scott Rosenberg: "For Salon, or any other standalone independent that needs to pay not only for content but for bandwidth and software and health plans for employees and so forth, some variation on the subscription plan is the only way to go." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Wired: "There are a lot more voters downloading music than there are music company executives," Hayes warned. "If the RIAA was my client, I'd advise them to think this one through again."  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

On this day in 1998, Netscape threw all their balls in the air.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Roe v Wade Permanent link to this item in the archive.

On this day 30 years ago, the US Supreme Court issued its decision in Roe v Wade, forever changing US law, culture, society, lifestyles, and setting in motion a philosophical debate that continues to this day. Whether you're pro-life or pro-choice, or somewhere inbetween, this may be a moment to pause and perhaps listen, to understand that there are points of view other than your own, and hard questions that do not have simple answers.

There appears to be no mention of Roe v Wade on the Supreme Court's website. I thought this was notable.

$400 a month Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Prescription drugs cost a lot. Yesterday I refilled just one of my must-have prescriptions, the kind of stuff I have to take for the rest of my life or else I die. I have health insurance, for now, but the co-pay is pretty high. I asked what it would cost if I didn't have insurance. $400 per month. And that's just one drug. How do people pay for this? How does the government justify going to war in Iraq. Where are the priorities. If Bush had to pay $400 per month for one drug, out of his own pocket, I can't imagine he'd have too much bandwidth left for Saddam Hussein.

Okay, five minutes later I've already gotten a flame. No, I didn't know they were so expensive. Sue me. Part of the philosophy of weblogs is that we don't mind sharing epiphanies, even if it makes us look stupid, to some. So, why was I so clueless? Because I've had good health insurance and good health, no reason to learn, or be concerned. It's easy to look the other way when it's someone else's problem. I'm just human, no claims of sainthood here.


Permanent link to archive for Tuesday, January 21, 2003. Tuesday, January 21, 2003

News.Com: "A federal judge on Tuesday ordered Verizon Communications to disclose the identity of an alleged peer-to-peer pirate in a legal decision that could make it easier for the music industry to crack down on file swapping." 

Daypop weblog: "There are 3000 more weblogs in the index which brings the total number of sites spidered to 10,500." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Lance redesigns Davos Newbies, but keeps the name. I think he's right to do it, the old design, a Garrett Vreeland beauty, was showing its age. And as Lance says, he's no longer a Davos insider. But the spirit of Davos is something to attach to, and just as Scripting News isn't just about scripting -- but rather a philosophy that started with scripting -- Davos Newbies makes sense as the name for Lance's weblog. It's been a three-year run, and remains a must-read for me. Every time he updates I'm there, with a sweaty mouse finger, anxious to see what Lance has to say. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named evan.gifEvan Williams says centralized news aggregators are the wave of the future. We tried that, before the dotcom bust, and perhaps it could have paid for itself through advertising, but really, I have my doubts. Later in the post Evan says "I wish we'd have had the resources to keep NewsBlogger going." Exactly. Why did NewsBlogger fail (and My.UserLand) yet the aggregator in Radio is flourishing and has spawned a huge amount of competition.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Now, on the other hand, it would be worth $40 per year, to me, to be able to offload the news aggregator to a centralized server. I expect I'll do a lot of traveling this year, with all kinds of net connections, some not very good. But is it a good business for UserLand to go into? I would advise against it. Keep selling desktop news aggregators. It's proven that people will pay for software that runs on their own machine. They expect to get centralized services for free. That's the problem Blogger has. Lots of users. Lots of free users. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Evan responds. Of course if there had been any money in NewsBlogger you could have hired someone to add the bandwidth to grow the idea. And My.UserLand did get commercialized -- it's the aggregator in Radio. Same software.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Peking Duck: "Nice guys always finish last in Beijing." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Bryan did a kickass Harvard theme for Radio. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Wildgrape NewsDesk is a "simple and fast RSS reader for Microsoft .Net." 

Minor update to the RSS 2.0 spec. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Two years ago today: "I'm Uncle Sam, that's who I am. Been hidin' out in a rock and roll band." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jon Udell: "It's cool to see that JavaScript can be as Perlishly terse as this." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Seth Dillingham: Thread-based Global Variables in UserTalkPermanent link to this item in the archive.

The callbacks for the Radio RSS-generator are released. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Gnome-Girl: "I can be a complicated communicator." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

News.Com: "When Yahoo began selling premium services, the move was ridiculed by analysts." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jeff Kandt added a RSS feed for comments on each post. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Tim Bray on RSS Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Tim Bray wrote a think piece about RSS. My comments follow.

There's a misunderstanding in Tim's piece about UserLand's aggregator. Radio runs on the desktop, just like NNW -- its user interface is HTTP/HTML, so you read it in a browser, but you're talking to a server on 127.0.0.1. Therefore the scaling issues for both products are identical, but imho, manageable.

Tim said in his lead paragraph to expect breakage, but I'm going to be a stinker. No breakage. Period.

A picture named gnomegirl.gif


Permanent link to archive for Monday, January 20, 2003. Monday, January 20, 2003

A picture named herschfeld.gifNY Times: "Albert Hirschfeld, whose inimitable caricatures captured the appearance and personality of theater people for more than half a century, died in his sleep today in New York City. He was 99 years old." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Trial balloon: "A simple addition to discussion group software makes it easy for a user to go to one place to monitor all conversations he or she is part of." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Simon Willison asks what to do when soneone hijacks an identity in weblog comments. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I just improved Sunday's RSS-generator-for-Radio so that callbacks can now generate attributes on elements. As they say, still diggin. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Bryan Bell is working on a theme for Harvard weblogs. I'm trying it out. I want it to be more dramatic. Harvard is the crimson school. I'm going to look for a really definitive Harvard website. If you find one send me some email. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Check this out. My.Harvard.Edu. Wow. I bet they'll like RSSPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Paul Boutin found the Republican astroturf generator. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Lance: "Will I suffer withdrawal pangs from not going to Davos this week?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

SourceID is "an open project site for Digital Identity ideas, protocols & software." 

This is an interesting site.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Slashdot: "Kevin Mitnick is getting back online and can start taking email tomorrow, January 21." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jenny: "I will never buy SimCity 4 because I can tell how addictive it is just from the web site." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named robbship.gifTom Hume: "Track comments provided as RSS feeds." Yes, of course, that is a valid option. I decided not to promote that because I don't want comments mixed in with the news aggregator, any more than I want news mixed with email. Each platform has its purpose. And there's the problem of when to unsubscribe from a comment feed. There doesn't seem to be an answer to that. Third reason, it's time to solve the global identity problem. We can't trust Microsoft to do this. By now they must know that. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

John Burkhardt shares his angst about SUVs. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Tucker Goodrich: "This innocuous little fly just invites being peed upon." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Wired: "The fact that movie and consumer electronics industry groups are not in on the new alliance is notable." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Start me up Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Good morning. A few notes on starting up my weblog. It's 4:40AM Pacific, which is 1:40PM in Paris. In a few minutes I'm going to be interviewed by a German newspaper in London. The first W in WWW stands for World. No kidding.

I go to my Manila site and Flip Home Page. Then I click on the Edit With Radio button. I bring the Radio app to the front. There's the outline. I choose SN Rules from the Boilerplate sub-menu of the Bookmarks menu in Radio. It adds the rules you see in the screen shot. (Or you will see when I link it in after taking it.) But I get ahead of myself.

Then I add a new headline. Start me up. It's the first line of a Rolling Stones song. One that they sang in their HBO concert in NYC on Saturday night, which I watched on Sunday, thanks to my TiVO. No commercials to skip, by the way, so no BigCo exec to piss off. Paid for, out of my $70 per month fee to Hollywood and GM. Why do I always mention this? Becuase I pay them every damned month so they can get on TV and call me a pirate. Huh? Oy.

Anyway. Then I have a blank outline. Unlike some writers, I love a blank slate and never have trouble filling it. My psyche generates lots of stuff. I try to filter out the angst. I've learned that's not popular. It's still there of course, just filtered. A day has begun. Ahhh.

More Stones lyrics: "My eyes dilate, my lips go green. My hands are greasy. She's a mean, mean machine."


Permanent link to archive for Sunday, January 19, 2003. Sunday, January 19, 2003

For review: How to extend Radio's RSS generatorPermanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "The evidence is now overwhelming that Linux, once a symbol of software's counterculture, has become a mainstream technology." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named fan.gifFootball: Tampa Bay, Oakland win. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Digital Hit is blogging the Golden Globe awards. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Zawodny: My stuff is where? Exactly. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Peking Duck, a weblog from Beijing, is totally right on. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Every time I post a comment on a weblog I have to remember to go back and see if anyone followed up. We have to figure a way to automate this. Agree or disagree? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named mickey.gifOf course the really big news will come later today when the semi-finals of US football are played, the league-level championships, to decide who plays in this year's SuperBowl. The finalists are Oakland, Tennessee, Tampa Bay and Philadelphia. Both NY teams made the playoffs, but they got nuked in earlier rounds, as did the local faves, the SF 49ers, who fired their coach shortly after losing. Yosemite Sam, pictured below, is a caricature of a 49er. I don't know if he asked if there's gold in them thar hills, but he did use the word galoot a lot, mostly to refer to other Warner Bros cartoon characters. The great thing about Sam is that he could fire his guns at the ground and he was so small he would lift off. Almost everything pissed him off. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Y'darned galoot!!Thanks to Ben Hammersley for summarizing all the trackbacks and pushbacks and post-its and what-not. I'm old school. I think the cool thing about weblogs is that they are not discussion groups or mail lists. If I want to know what all the people are saying there are ways to do that, but very often I'm content to read email and a few weblogs that I trust. Personally I don't think there's gold in them thar hills, but of course I've been wrong before. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

For some reason I thought of Brent when I saw thisPermanent link to this item in the archive.

David Weinberger: Open Spectrum FAQ. "Imagine rather than having to worry about how much 'bandwidth' is enough, everyone had unlimited access to bits so that the size of what you communicate simply didn't matter." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

According to dweb.blogspot.com, Pyra changed the IP address for blogspot, so people in China can now access all the sites hosted there. Of course the Chinese censors are certain to figure out what's going on. Postscript: Several readers have pointed out that China controls its own DNS, so it has blocked the Dweb site at that level.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Tri-Valley Herald: "Protesters marched up Market Street to the Civic Center, where celebrity speakers including actor Martin Sheen and singers Bonnie Raitt and Joan Baez addressed the crowd." An actor who plays the President, gives a speech at a real demonstration. That crosses a line.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Three years ago today Hedy Lamarr died.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Saturday, January 18, 2003. Saturday, January 18, 2003

Reuters: "A top music industry representative says Internet service providers will be asked to pay up for giving their customers access to free song-swapping sites." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Key phrase: Substantial non-infringing usePermanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "A New York court has ruled that Network Associates, a maker of popular antivirus and computer security software, may not require people who buy the software to get permission from the company before publishing reviews of its products." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Lessig proposes a small tax on fifty-year-old copyrights.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jack Balkin: "The Supremes have made new law that puts the DMCA into question." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

BBC: "Demonstrations in Japan were followed by protests in Pakistan, the Middle East and Russia. Others are taking place in Europe and the United States." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A feature request for anyone doing an RSS aggregator. Watch for enclosures. When you spot one, make note. If you're running at 2AM (a configurable time) download all the enclosures you've found, and put them in a folder on the local hard disk. Present them to the user when he or she arrives in the morning. This way large media objects, songs and movies, can be transmitted overnight using the network defined by RSS. This idea came from Adam Curry.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Scoble enters the great Alpha Male debate with tips for girls on how to get one. Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Friday, January 17, 2003. Friday, January 17, 2003

Elizabeth Spiers: "My VC rolodex is just one big graveyard." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Impressive. The NY Times has a Lessig op-ed on the Eldred decision. We had his thoughts within minutes. I heard a brief report on NPR, then tuned in Radio Lessig. Bing. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Salon: "The Eldred decision, in the words of University of Buffalo law professor Shubha Gosh, 'deconstitutionalizes' copyright, pushing it father into the realm of policy and power battles and away from the principles that have anchored the system for two centuries. That means public interest advocates and activists must take their battles to the public sphere and the halls of Congress." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Computerworld: Spam's getting more sophisticated

Paul Boutin: "A few alert Googlers have noticed that dozens of local newspapers from Boston to Honolulu have run the same letter under different names nationwide." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Some people dis the Bay Area, but they should check out what spring is like here. It's heaven on earth. And it's still just mid-January. Fruit trees are already in bloom. The smells are to die for. Better than cheesecake. And not fattening. Hey I'm going for three hikes this weekend. How about that NY? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Brian Buck: "Dave's fruit tree blossoms sound nice!" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Open source advocate Bruce Perens is a guest on NPR Science Friday, in the Bay Area on KQEDPermanent link to this item in the archive.

News.Com has a new page describing their RSS feeds. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Thanks to Xeni Jardin for this inspiring demo of recursion. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Webcast of today's anti-spam conference at MIT. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Bill Moyers covers copyright on PBS tonight. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Brian Buck: "There are several hundred people protesting at the UN right outside my window." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jesse Shanks: Using OmniGraffle as an RSS News Reader with ApplescriptPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Rogers Cadenhead: "Without notifying users, AOL adds http://free.aol.com to the browser's trusted sites zone, enabling executable code from that domain to be run without permission." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jeremy Zawodny: "It seems that api.google.com has been having troubles for much of the night." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

News.Com: "Apple Computer has forced a developer to stop distributing a plug-in that turned its iTunes music player into peer-to-peer music-sharing software." 

I went to lunch yesterday with Sandy Wilbourn, a friend since college in the early-mid 70s. Sandy used to be at Harvard, or his wife taught there, or something like that. I'm not sure. Anyway at lunch he said something about me that resonated. We were talking about using the facilities, libraries, gyms, etc on the campus, and Sandy said that I should just go there and act like I belonged. He and I both agreed that's one of my secrets of success. Now it's not such a secret!  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Martin Schwimmer digs back through the archives and finds a glitch in the NY Times' memory bank.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named pointcast.gifA little over seven years ago I wrote a glowing review of the then-new Pointcast system. The review ran in Wired, and in huge type at Pointcast's tradeshow booth. And for the next seven years, after Pointcast's quick demise, we've been rebuilding the system, with open formats, choice, two-way-ness, and with a better scaling proposition. People who love the network that RSS forms will recognize the story. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Register: "I suggested that they should put out files with legitimate titles and put inside them silence or random noise and saturate the file sharing networks with those files. That did start the poisoning."  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Wired: "To link directly to some newspapers' content, Danish search firm Newsbooster now must use the sort of decentralized subterfuge utilized by companies that distribute file-sharing applications." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times profile of renaissance blogger, Glenn Reynolds. Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Thursday, January 16, 2003. Thursday, January 16, 2003

Tara Sue: "Politicians are more likely to defend the Web and its users once they utilize the Web." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named mickey.gifWired: "Media companies, which faced the prospect of losing control of early copyrighted works featuring iconic characters such as Mickey Mouse, had argued that they needed the extension to compete globally, exploit new technologies not envisioned when Congress last set copyright terms in 1976 and maintain incentives to restore old works." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jon Udell reviews Apple's Safari browser.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A new Bryan Bell theme? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

News.Com reports that Microsoft will issue it's first-ever stock dividend, and that Richard Parsons will replace Steve Case as AOL's chairman. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Tim Jarrett reports that the high water mark on Weblogs.Com grows, on average, by 2.8 weblogs per day. 

Syndirella is an RSS aggregator for .Net. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Glenn Reynolds is now a blogger-in-residence at MSBC. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

English 515 at Purdue University focuses on weblogs. One of the assignments is to read this weblog.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

James Speth: "I just received a Notice of Breach and Termination of License letter from Apple, stating that I violated my license to the Device Plug-in API which iCommune uses." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

New Scientist: "The entire site may have been blocked to prevent Chinese internet users reaching one blog in particular: dweb.blogspot.com. This site is has published lists of proxy servers that can be used to gain access to restricted web sites from within China." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

It's like a thing of nature, watch a natural-born blogger find his voice. The Supreme Court will have to stand by you and me someday. The executive branch of the US government will eventually do what China does. A few more loops and we'll be there. All roads lead to that. We will be within our rights, in every way. The First Amendment will protect what we do. The Sonny Bono law will seem like a small thing. Then, we will be very glad to have a highly principled constitutional scholar who hasn't sold out on our side -- and that's you Professor Lessig, in case you haven't figured that out yet.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A thread on Cadenhead's weblog about authors and copyrights. I asked Aaron Swartz why his opinion on Rogers' work matters. "Isn't that between him and his publisher and his readers? I've asked Lessig the same question and I don't get a satisfactory answer. If you think he's screwing up, compete with him. Isn't that the American way?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Karlin Lillington gets Barrapunto'd. Don't worry it's PG-13. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "The Supreme Court today upheld the 20-year extension that Congress granted to all existing copyrights in 1998, declaring that while the extension might have been bad policy, it fell clearly within Congress's constitutional authority." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "In a new program to encourage graduate students to enter public service, Harvard University plans to give $14 million in 'presidential scholarships' over the next three years to 200 to 300 graduate students interested in public service or research careers." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

News.Com: "Venture funds, which tend to have a life of 10 to 12 years, have seen the return on their limited partners' investments fallen of late." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "Mr. Young estimates that Apple's cash position is the equivalent of $12 a share. The company's shares closed at $14.43 yesterday, down 18 cents for the day. In after-hours trading, Apple shares fell further, to $14.10." Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Wednesday, January 15, 2003. Wednesday, January 15, 2003

Big Walleye picSjoerd Visscher: "XHTML, and specifically version 2.0, is a perfect dataformat for weblogs." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

David Galbraith: "Let's face it NY is much better than Irwindale." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Two new installments in Halley's alpha male series. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Dan Gillmor: "Swipe a CD from a record store and you'll get arrested. But when Congress authorizes the entertainment industry to steal from you -- well, that's the American way." 

Computerworld: "On flight LH 418 from Frankfurt to Washington, Lufthansa AG today began a three-month trial of a new onboard wireless broadband service that allows travelers to connect to the Internet some 30,000 feet in the sky." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Rogers Cadenhead: "Breaking even or doubling my cost wouldn't be nearly enough incentive to yoke myself to a keyboard for months at a time as the Earth goes about its normal day-to-day business in my absence."  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named lessig.gifLessig: "The Supreme Court has rejected our challenge to the Sonny Bono Law." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

John Palfrey: "No one could have done a better job than Larry Lessig did." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Donna Wentworth is gathering links on the Eldred decision. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

AP: "A huge victory for Disney and other companies." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Forbes: "Somewhere in Burbank a mouse called Mickey is smiling." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Lessig: "It has often been said that movements gain by losing in the Supreme Court." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Joi Ito: "The default path is that we are stripped of our rights." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Halley: "..transfixed by the picture of Professor Lessig on his blog." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Mitch Wagner at InternetWeek interviewed me. Pretty good. There are a couple of things that I'd clarify (esp the use of the word innovation), but for the most part, it reflects what I believe. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

One of the Radio weblogs, by Roland Piquepaille, is being Slashdotted as we speak. Mazel tov Roland. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jamie Zawinski on Apple's decision not to use Mozilla in Safari. "I'm not bitter." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

BBC: "The US technology and music industries reach a deal to help protect copyright and stop piracy but not everyone supports the plan." Customers. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Karlin Lillington: "The new standard for cutting-edge adventure tourism is going to be a flight into space and a stay at a space hotel." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Five years ago today XML-RPC was zoooooooming.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Tuesday, January 14, 2003. Tuesday, January 14, 2003

Halley: "A dog ran right in front of my car and I tried ot miss him, but I hit him with a big terrible thunk noise." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

There is something ridiculously pathetic about people who trash SF to help them feel justified in living in NY. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

McCusker: "Wes's comments remind me of my intention to start using a hand puppet sometimes when I go out to play in the evenings." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Wired: Partying Like 1999.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A couple of ridiculously easy innovations from Phillip Pearson. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jeffrey Zeldman, a leading proponent of Web standards, shares Mark Pilgrim's disbelief at the discontinuity in the W3C roadmap. "By design, the present XHTML 2.0 draft is not backward compatible with HTML 4 or XHTML 1." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Sebastian Delmont (via email): "Francisco Toro used to work for the NY Times, but his coverage of the situation in Venezuela on his blog got him in a conflict of interests. So he quit!" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I almost forgot. Seven months since my last cigarette.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jenny reminds me not to forget the librarians, and I totally agree; and I'm hoping that when the time comes, she and other librarians-with-weblogs will help me find the right librarian to talk with at Harvard. My goal is to do as little work as possible. Glenn Reynolds nailed it when he said I was basically a blogger-in-residence at Harvard. Exactly right, if it works as I hope it does. A pied piper. And by the way I hope to invite visiting bloggers, people who come to give a presentation about what blogging means to them, in each of the disciplines that are taught at Harvard. The beauty of a university is that it has so many interfaces to the rest of the world. Each of them can be a source and recipient of evangelism. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

BBC: "On 15 January Lufthansa will start offering travellers the ability to surf the net and send and receive e-mails in real time as they fly." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

On this day in 1998, XML-RPC, as an idea, was bornPermanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named hiptop.gifTara Sue didn't win last night, but the party was great, and I met some new people and old heroes. The one outstanding award went for product design to the Danger Hiptop guys. I met one of them at the party. They read Scripting News. Excellent. I talked briefly with Will Wright, the SimCity guy. I was just thinking a few days ago it was time to get back in their loop. The new SimCity apparently is compatible with The Sims. Very good. I've already given them a few years of my life, a few more won't hurt. Steven Wolfram won the top award. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Pet peeve about Silicon Valley. Nothing is open at 3AM. No Starbucks. Hey there aren't even any good restaurants open at 3AM. Denny's? Hmm. When I asked Jamis about this a few years ago he said zoning wouldn't permit it (I wanted him to keep Bucks open 24 hours a day so programmers would have somewhere to go to hang out with people). But Safeway supermarkets are open 24 hours a day. So it can't be totally illegal. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named bus.gifI'm planning the blogging website for Harvard in my head, and thought of a question I'd like to ask Harvard students and faculty. Would you like to participate in a project to create knowledge? I would have liked that question when I was a student. Of course! Yes yes yes. That's why I came to college. But there were so few ways for students to participate when I was a student. I wonder if it's like that at Harvard. I think about the Yahoo guys at Stanford and how inspired they were. What if a university like Harvard, not just a few students, got busy mapping the world of knowledge on the Internet. Each student would take responsibility for some period of time for some aspect of world knowledge. When they graduate they pass it on, or even better, take the responsibility with them, into life. Does any of this make sense? I'm beta testing ideas here as I go. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Sebastien Paquet: Personal knowledge publishingPermanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Monday, January 13, 2003. Monday, January 13, 2003

Tonight we're up in San Francisco at the Rave Awards, rootin for Tara Sue all the way.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jon Udell: Services and LinksPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Mark Pilgrim: "After keeping up with all the latest standards, painstakingly marking up all my content, and validating every last page on my site, Iím still stuck in a dead end." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

PC Mag: "One of the big stories to come out of this year's CES is the approaching availability of 802.11g, which promises 54-Mbps wireless connectivity." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Press release: "Jupitermedia Corporation today announced that its Jupiter Research division will be the first research advisory firm to offer dedicated research analyst Weblogs." 

A picture named maynardGKrebbs.gifNY Times eulogy for Steve Case. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Doc Searls: "AOL is toast." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

David Galbraith: "What is amazing is that AOL ever became big in the first place when ten years ago they were already an anachronism." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

John Palfrey is co-director of the Berkman Center at Harvard Law School, where I'm a fellow. I guess in some sense John is my boss. I haven't had one of those in a long time. Weird feeling. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

BTW, that's one of my heroes, Maynard G Krebs, to the right. He's appeared on Scripting News for the last three January 13ths. Not sure why, but why not? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

According to News.Com, Web Services start-up Flamenco "has secured $14.5 million in two rounds of funding." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Sam Ruby is organizing a blogger's dinner in Seattle two weeks from now. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

RFC: RSS 2.0 and the MetaWeblog API Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Karlin Lillington reports on the 16-year-old Irish boy whose super-fast Web browser may win him a chance to study computer engineering in the US. Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Sunday, January 12, 2003. Sunday, January 12, 2003

A picture named case.gifCNN: Case resigns as AOL chairman. "Plans for Case's departure come amid speculation that the company is close to writing down the value of its assets by billions due to the reduced value of its troubled Internet service provider, America Online, since the merger." Other reports: Reuters, News.Com, BBC 

Adam Medros: "I'm a grad student at Harvard Business School and I think the only blogger on campus."  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named dietcoke.gifThis is not an ad for Diet Coke. They didn't pay me for a product placement. There is no requirement that you read this text. Feel free to skip to the next item. I placed the Diet Coke logo here because I like their product. I used to be a Diet Pepsi drinker. Then I started hanging out with my brother last summer when I got sick. He was drinking Diet Coke, so I decided to try it, and I liked it. Next time I went to the store I bought a six-pack. Since then I really don't care for the taste of Diet Pepsi. Oddly enough, my brother flipped too, now he drinks Diet Pepsi. So the market share of the two leading diet colas remains unchanged.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

LawMeme: "Google claims that PageRank is commercial speech, protected by the First Amendment." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named nesson.gifBoston Globe: "Nesson, who joined the Harvard Law faculty in 1966 and earned tenure in 1969, is widely known for his eccentric teaching style." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Riveting MP3 interview with Nesson.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "Anyone who has ever tried to pry a girl offline knows that girls like computers. They just don't understand how they work." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Paolo and JY comment on Dan Bricklin's SMBmeta. Several people at last night's dinner said they found the idea interesting.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A directory of HipLogs. They're just getting started. Photos of people doing dorky things. What else is there? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named gretchen.gifGreat great blogger's dinner last night. Tara Sue was there. I thought she'd be a skinny North Carolina Republican type, but she's not like that at all. I told her she's a hippie chick and she laughed (while denying it). She's very earthy and happy person, really sweet. Spent a bunch of time talking with Evan Williams about blogging APIs and the blogspot outage in China. Talked with Gretchen Pirillo about acting in San Francisco. Raines Cohen came in his wonderful electric car. He's an amazing guy (wish I had a picture of the car). After dinner we went to a bar on 24th St that has an outdoor patio that we took over, and hung out there for a two-three hours. Chris Pirillo has a list of the weblogs that were in attendence. Everyone had a good time. Gotta do it again. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

And lest I forget, Simon Fell has black hair! Permanent link to this item in the archive.

AP: "Maurice Gibb, a member of the famed disco band the Bee Gees, died Sunday at a Miami Beach hospital, his family said. He was 53." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Samizdata: "People say stupid things when you're trying to quit smoking." Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Saturday, January 11, 2003. Saturday, January 11, 2003

Happy Birthday to Radio 8. One year old today.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Don't forget the hamburger blogger dinner tonite in SF. Simon Fell will be there. Cooooooooooool. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Joi Ito: "I'm glad I got to say 'blog' on national TV." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Susan Kitchens: What real women do with duct tapePermanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named duct.gifSaw a great movie last night with Scoble. It keeps reverberating. Complex. I'm sure to write about it. BTW, I paid to see the movie, including commercials at the beginning. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

John Palfrey: "Dave Winer's work in developing open standards for software, promoting the growth of widespread and broadly accessible Web publishing tools and content, and leading the blogging movement is outstanding."  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Hiptop explains how to do a weblog. "Send mail from your hiptop to hiplog@hiplog.com. That's it! You're blogging!" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

InfoWorld: Blogs in the EnterprisePermanent link to this item in the archive.

CNN: Illinois Gov Ryan expected to empty death rowPermanent link to this item in the archive.

AP: "My favorite product that I got for Christmas is TiVo," FCC chairman Michael Powell said during a question and answer session at the International Consumer Electronics Show. "TiVo is God's machine."  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Wired: "An award-winning science fiction writer and digital rights activist has persuaded the publisher of his first novel to make the book available free online for anyone to read, print or even republish on paper." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Blogspace shutdown in China Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named tiananmen.gifMark Kraft: "As some of you are no doubt aware, China has blocked access to all Blogspot weblogs. Users can post, but they can't see whether what they've written has gone through. Likewise, others from China can't read their weblogs."

Peking Duck: "Yes, it appears the Chinese government has imposed a permanent nationwide ban on all blogspot.com sites."

Open Flows: "After talking to other blogspot users all over China it seems that the ban is present throughout the entire country."

BWG: "Bloggers from inside China are upset about that."

Russell Beattie: "Cisco made a shitload of money selling their firewalls to China."

Shelley Powers: "The use of proxies is a known workaround for censorship."

A picture named edelman.gifBen Edelman, at Berkman: "I've actually known about this for a couple days, and this isn't the first time China has blocked blogspot, according to my records. In fact, this isn't really all that unusual -- it's the kind of block China often imposes from time to time, just like when they blocked all domains virtual-hosted by Dotster and Enom. Since China's blocks are almost always implemented by IP address, it's highly likely that whoever imposed the block didn't (and indeed still doesn't) understand the far-reaching effects of doing so."

NY Times: "Some 10,000 people took the streets in the eastern city of Hefei this week in what appears to have been the largest student demonstration since the Tiananmen Square human rights protests of 1989. But the students had a much narrower agenda: traffic safety."


Permanent link to archive for Friday, January 10, 2003. Friday, January 10, 2003

DaveNet: Chapter 5 in which Dave goes to HarvardPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Ooops. Reading Jim Roepcke's weblog, I just realized that Apple crushed a couple of small developers by shipping their own Web browser. I fell into the same trap so many other people do -- thinking only of Microsoft. Users may not worry, but they should. It's in their interest to have small innovative developers trying out new ideas. No matter how they spin it, it's bad news for a developer when Apple bundles a competitor to your product. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

David Weinberger: The Problem with MetadataPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Kevin Werbach: "With the announcement this week of Microsoft's SPOT devices and Apples 802.11g/Bluetooth laptop, the battle is joined. But where is the technical community?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A new mail list for the MetaWeblog API  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I removed the caveat from metaWeblog.newMediaObject, freezing the entry-point, and permitting deployment. I still owe you an RFC for using namespaces in structs in the MetaWeblog API.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Dan Bricklin: SMBmeta IntroductionPermanent link to this item in the archive.

News.Com: FM gets strong reception at CESPermanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named halley.gifDan Gillmor's spin on the Two-Way-Web: "Many journalists have yet to discover: in an emerging era of multidirectional, digital communications, the audience can be an integral part of the process." I'm a bit more radical. The idea of "audience" is obsolete. The new medium is read-write. Low-low barrier to entry.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jon Udell: "Ultimately, it's not about RSS any more than it was about NNTP. It's about the evolution of our species toward shared consciousness." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Hamburger Blogger Dinner in SF on Saturday nite. Scoble, Pirillo and me. And Tara Sue? Could be. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Last year on this day: "If you knew you were going to be stranded on a deserted island and could only take one website with you, which would it be?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Three years ago: "That's AOL Folks!" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Halley: "Dave, the Boston bloggers will miss you today at lunch, but we now reserve an honorary chair for you at all Boston blogging events." Nice! Permanent link to this item in the archive.

People are really excited about the Harvard thing. That is so cool. Me too. I woke up in the middle of the night, my head buzzing with ideas. Can we do this? How about that? Etc etc. I need to start a website. And a directory. Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Thursday, January 09, 2003. Thursday, January 09, 2003

I don't usually get scooped on stories about me.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named seal.gifIt's true, it's true. I've been offered a fellowship at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School, and have, of course, accepted. It's a very exciting opportunity. Check out this section of yesterday's DaveNet for an idea of what we're going to work on. And of course over the coming weeks and months I'll write more. I'm going to spend a lot of time in Cambridge this year. Totally looking forward. Onward! Permanent link to this item in the archive.

1/1/03: "Believe it or not I'm applying for a job in academia." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jon Udell is getting record flow on his weblog. The librarians are figuring out what he's doing. Nice. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Aaron Swartz: "ICANN is soliciting comments on two important whois issues." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

InfoSynch: "Sony's latest handheld is state-of-the-art; features include a 200 MHz processor, Palm OS 5, integrated Bluetooth, a WiFi expansion slot and a 2 megapixel digital camera." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named sheila.gifNY Times: "Microsoft has built a new national wireless data network, based on the data broadcasting ability of FM radio stations. The company says that compared with traditional paging systems, this network makes it cheaper both to broadcast data and build receivers." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Rogers Cadenhead: "Wishing death upon a political antagonist is truly loathsome." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Ernie the Attorney: "When I get home I watch the news broadcast that has been captured by my TiVo. It's nice to skip through the commercials. But I usually skip through the stories too." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

MacInTouch reader comments on Safari. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Clay Shirky: "The business Fred Smith imagined being in -- build a network that's cheap to run but charge customers as it if were expensive -- is the business the telephone companies are in today." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named doctorow.gifCongrats to Cory Doctorow on the publication of his new science fiction book, Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom. "Jules is a young man barely a century old. He's lived long enough to see the cure for death and the end of scarcity, to learn ten languages and compose three symphonies and to realize his boyhood dream of taking up residence in Disney World." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Halley: "A nice young woman wrote me by email saying she doesn't want to keep reading about how to become an Alpha Male, rather would like to know how to get one." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Cristian Vidmar: How about pie-based browsing? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Safari Enhancer is an "application for enabling several hidden features of the Safari webbrowser beta." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named formalSmall.gifHeads-up: I'm going to do another RFC to extend the MetaWeblog API this morning showing how to use namespaces for the metadata in the struct. The hard part of writing the RFC is explaining why you would want to do this. Most people won't care. The question came up on the BloggerDev mail list last week. BTW, when I say people should support the MetaWeblog API, I also mean they should support the Blogger API. MetaWeblog just adds a few calls that were missing from the Blogger API. The naming is unfortunate because Pyra is radically changing the Blogger API, breaking everyone who implemented it. Presumably someday the pages describing the API will disappear. We should do a backup and a rename, those of us who plan to continue to support it, regardless of what Pyra does. I wish we could convince them to tread more lightly. Perhaps the best thing to do is to fill in the MetaWeblog API, with docs for the entry-points that are currently documented on the Blogger site. We'll get through this. It's a fairly broadly supported API, despite Pyra's disclaimer.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Two years ago: "A boat that leaks lacks integrity. If the leaking gets bad enough it stops being a boat and becomes a sunken boat. If someone is living on the boat, it becomes a houseboat. If its nature changes, so does the name." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Last year on this day, Mark Pilgrim won the Best Scripting Weblog award. Last year there were barely enough scripting weblogs to have a category. I think Mark would still win today. In the last year he has done some incredibly good work, and now there are dozens if not hundreds of scripting weblogs.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Phillip Pearson: RSS timezone issue when importingPermanent link to this item in the archive.

McCusker's weblog gets more interesting every week. Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Wednesday, January 08, 2003. Wednesday, January 08, 2003

DaveNet: First essay of the yearPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Daniel Berlinger: "We almost had convergence recently, but Pyra went another way. It's a real shame. I wish they hadn't. It's not too late."  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Interesting bit about me by James Hong. And one by Donna Wentworth. My comments are belowPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Seth Russell: "Google is great, but it's not very good if you want to know what's being said right now." Agreed. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

LiveJournal has an XML-RPC interfacePermanent link to this item in the archive.

Holy guacamole. JRobb says he's getting a Mac? Yikes. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Bruce Perens: "We believe that there should be a fair, competitive market for computer software, both proprietary and Open Source." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

If I had a billion dollars I'd pay each of you $10,000 to read this page carefully, think about it, and then get started building a directory for each of three subjects you're passionate about and knowledgable of. All the technology is there. The format is open and brain-dead simple. And the philosophy is right too, imho. It's just waiting for people to decide to make it happen. Someday it will. I'd rather not wait any longer. Thanks for listening. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named bruce.gifHey it already seems like ages since I was in NY. I want to go back. I like being there, even when the weather in Calif is better. I can totally imagine how the NY radio stations are covering the Giants loss to the 49ers. They're so resigned to failure in football. But not in music. One thing I noticed is that they listen to lots of Bruce Springsteen in NY. I heard a bunch of old songs I hadn't heard in years. Makes sense, he's a local boy, kind of like Huey Lewis is to the Bay Area (Bruce is bigger, but then so is NY). One song I hadn't heard in ages is Rosalita. It goes like this. "My tires were slashed and I almost crashed but the Lord had mercy. My machine she's a dud, I'm stuck in the mud somewhere in the swamps of Jersey. Hold on tight, stay up all night 'cause Rosie I'm comin' on strong. By the time we meet the morning light I will hold you in my arms." It's one of those songs that once you hear it it just reverberates in your head for days and days. It's so sweet and romantic, so young, like all music you adored when you were young, it's a time machine when you're older. Like me. Now.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Paul Boutin posted an example file for Apple's Keynote. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Dave Hyatt, a member of the Safari team at Apple (that's their new Web browser) has a weblog, and there he responds to the issues raised by Mark Pilgrim. This is fantastic. This is how the Web is supposed to work. Bravo.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named steve.gifPrediction: At some trade show in three months, at the end, Steve Jobs will say "Oh I almost forgot. I have one more thing." Everyone sucks in their breath. "We know you like our new Web browser, Safari, because there have been 285 million downloads. Did you know it's the most popular browser on the Internet? Well almost every one of the users has requested a tabbed interface, some many times. So we decided, what the heck, let's give them what they want." A virtual curtain opens on screen, says Tabs For Safari. The worldwide audience ejaculates spontaneously. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Matthew Rothenberg: "Don't tell my wife, but I have a crush on Steve Jobs." OK. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Halley: "It's sexy and frothy." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Register: Start-up marries blogs and camera phones. The right way to do this, imho, is to connect the phone-to-weblog software through the MetaWeblog API, that way existing weblog users could participate, and new users would have choice of backend software. Any cellphone service provider that buys into this proposal will have to scrap it in a few months when the general solutions come out. Maybe less than a few months. Mobile blogging, or moblogging is very hot. So is choice for users. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Spoke with Tara Sue yesterday. She's coming to Calif for the Wired awards in SF next Monday. She's nominated for one of the awards. She's an entrepreneur now, CEO of Policlicks, they're going to make some kind of announcement next week. She'll be here Friday through Wednesday. Maybe we should have a spicy noodles dinner for Tara Sue? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Here's an RFC for an entry-point in the MetaWeblog API that uploads a new media object to the user's weblog. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Last year on this day: "Like cholesterol, there's good sarcasm and bad sarcasm." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Lauren Weinstein: Tiny Cell Phone or Big Brother?  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Paolo: "Introducing a new browser after 5 years is a pretty bold move from Apple." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Comments Permanent link to this item in the archive.

James says people hate me because I change my mind. Where I grew up it was considered a sign of weakness if you changed your mind. My father, the guy who's so sick now, used to give me a hard time when it even appeared that I had changed my mind. I never let him win that. To this day I insist that I have the right, even the responsibility, to change my mind if circumstances warrant it.

Suppose you get some new information. Or, on reflection, draw a different conclusion. How arrogant would it be to hold on to your old belief. What does it cost to change your mind? Why do people consider it a sign of weakness if you change your mind? I don't. Emphatically.

Now, to Donna's comments. I remember when Lessig and I had our first public exchange on the weblogs. That was nothing compared to what we said privately. Very strong opinions, both ways. But I never didn't admire Lessig as a human being. From the first time I saw him speak I knew he was someone I would get to know, and hoped we would become friends. There's nothing wrong with an opinion stated with strength and conviction. Even if it's wrong. No one has a patent on the truth. And power can be a source of safety, not just danger. Lessig has a powerful mind. I find that interesting. Where does that go? Who knows.

BTW, I like John Hiler too -- he writes for Corante as Donna does. A couple of times I said I didn't like some of the things he said. That doesn't mean I don't like the person. I'd like to buy John and Donna and AKMA a drink some day. Here's a toast to a strong opinion well-stated.

I wrote an email to Donna today. "If this is going to be an interesting medium, there are going to be differences of opinion. That's not Low Road. That's First Amendment, and that's (I think) what we all agree is sacred."


Permanent link to archive for Tuesday, January 07, 2003. Tuesday, January 07, 2003

A picture named cadillac.gifPaul Boutin: "The crowning touch: an enormous, silver-skinned laptop, half computer and half Cadillac Escalade." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Cadillac: "With a 345-horsepower engine, Escalade is the world's most powerful SUV and it has the muscle to back up its bold, distinctive style." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

JD Lasica: "I'd forgotten what a blast I'd had at past Macworlds." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Reviews of Apple's new browser: Mena Trott, Mark PilgrimPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Matthew Langham and Daniel Berlinger blogged Steve Jobs. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

News.Com on Apple announcements. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

BBC: Teenager wins DVD court battle. "The court acquitted Jon Johansen on all charges and said he did not break the law when he created a system that could remove copy protection on DVDs." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

AP: "A Norwegian teenager was acquitted in a key test case Tuesday of violating computer break-in laws with his program that circumvents security codes on Hollywood's DVD movies." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Brent Simmons: "An extension to the various weblog APIs that I'd love to see would be easy image uploading." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Chris Morley: "A new C++ implementation of XML-RPC client and server for easy integration in C++ apps based on py-xmlrpc.". 

1/11/01: Payloads for RSS. "When I started talking with Adam Curry late last year, he wanted me to think about high quality video on the Internet, and I totally didn't want to hear about it. Like a lot of people, I had tried it, and found it unsatisfying and frankly, exhausting." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Ziff-Davis has two more RSS 2.0 feeds. One for PC Mag reviews, and the other for tech news from eWeek. Hey it looks like someone got the religion. Excellent stuff. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Russell Beattie: "I forget what a freak I am sometimes." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named humanGnome.gifLouis Cipher wonders if Weblogs.Com will survive the blogging frenzy during the Steve Jobs keynote at MacWorld in San Francisco at 9AM today. It did last year. But the network is bigger this year. I guess the answer is we'll find out later today. Postscript: No problemmo. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Charles Cook updated XML-RPC for .Net. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Sumod and Dejan Jelovic have RSS aggregators for .Net. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Mary Jo Foley on Microsoft's CES announcements. Even better news. Mary Jo's column is now available as an RSS 2.0 feed, so you never have to miss it. Thanks! Permanent link to this item in the archive.

First DaveNet of the Year? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I still owe you all an essay to kick off the new year.

Basically, I was (and will) say that we've reached a plateau in our journey of technology. We've got all the basic ingredients for the Two-Way-Web in place. The back-end systems are maturing, with lots of choice. The XML-RPC interfaces are also maturing and (more important) standardizing. We went a lot further with the ManilaRPC interface, and the Edit This Page button in Manila, which is a great idea, still hasn't appeared in other mass market CMSes -- but I have no doubts the interfaces will deepen, and the convenience for users will increase, and the content systems will do more of the work.

Another innovation waiting in the wings -- directories. It's the next step after blogrolls.

The wizzy editing tools are coming from all corners, all platforms, mobile and desktop, you name it, someone is working on wiring it up to the content network defined by the MetaWeblog API.

Further, we have settled the outage in RSS, again with choice. People who like RDF are able to use that, at a cost in confusion, but that's factored in already. We got the features and extensibility we wanted in RSS 2.0. If there's any more work to do there it's just clarification or cleanup.

So the XML-RPC interfaces will deepen, the tools will keep coming, the back-ends will support the tools. Aggregators will be able to depend on more data in the RSS feeds.

The next challenge is spreading the gospel. There we have just begun.

Anyway, that seems like a good outline for a piece.

Hey maybe that's all I need to say.

Another section Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Before I forget, there's a major section that I've left out.

In the past I tried to rally, then I begged the investment community of Silicon Valley to drop a little change in the tipjar for new technology. They had gotten so far off their mission, they weren't investing in technology through the dot-com mess, they were investing in marketing, retailers, publishers, and then finally just hype. There was no substance. The result is a completely wrecked leading edge here in the land of the leading edge, Silicon Valley.

This year I'm done begging. It's over. I give up. The VCs can have this place. Good luck. I can't afford to wait for you. We have to find another way to finance the leading edge.


Permanent link to archive for Monday, January 06, 2003. Monday, January 06, 2003

A picture named bill.gifI got confirmation of the rumor below about Microsoft's announcement at CES. My source says that it's not just for software distribution. Heh. I wonder if it can be used to distribute MP3s. That would be fun, esp in Europe where all those 50-year-old copyrights are expiring as we speak. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

The Wired Rave Award nominees for 2003 are in. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

AP: NFL Says Giants' Game Ended with Referee ErrorPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Andre Torrez: "This application allows you to map out a new XML-RPC message with a tree control and then submit that request to any XML-RPC server. The response is then viewable in a separate window." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Chris Hanson: "The BDXmlRpcForWO framework provides an XML-RPC request handler for WebObjects 5.1 and 5.2." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Brian Buck: "I was able to walk with my walker to the garage where our car is parked, which is 4.5 blocks there, and 4.5 blocks back. That's the furthest I've been able to walk by a long margin. And let me tell you, it wore me out completely, and I'm definitely in a lot more pain today, but it was a big milestone in my recovery." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Only a rumor: Microsoft will announce, in the next few days, a software distribution system that works over radio. The announcement will come at Bill Gates' keynote at CES. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

This is not a rumor: Microsoft Instant Messenger is down, has been down for six hours.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Paolo reviews Virtual PC 6.0 for Mac OS X. He can run several different versions of Windows on the same machine at the same time.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "The city of Long Beach, Calif., plans to announce on Friday that it will make free wireless Internet access available in its downtown area as part of an effort to attract visitors and companies to the business district." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Branscum: "Down in Silicon Valley, Valley so Low, or so down, anyway, thanks to the shitty economy." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Werblog: "New economy companies pay little in dividends because they believe they can make better use of the cash than their shareholders." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Paul Haahr: "Continue taxing dividends, yet let companies expense them as they do with all other cash outflows." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Bruce Bartlett: "One of the things I like most about blogs is that they provide links to articles, information and commentary that would not otherwise come to my attention." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

John Robb: "Going to kick some serious ass this year." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Joshua Allen speaks up, eloquently, for The Semantic Web.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Halley: "Alpha Males get pussy."  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I was emailing with Halley last night and asked why she didn't have comments, given that her site is named Halley's Comment. She gave the right answer (see Nick Denton's comment below). Halley lets it hang out, and that's really cool. She's an Alpha Female, if there is such a thing. There are a few other women bloggers who can handle a strong opinion from a man without screaming abuse (there are others who play the A-card too quickly). Anyway, Sam Ruby of all people, picked up on Halley's comment about Alpha Males getting pussy, and he has a comment section, so have a look, and if you have a comment, do. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Nick Denton: "This is the way to deal with flamers: let them post on their own damn sites." Exactly. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "Phone calls over the Internet may finally be catching on." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

James Hong of HotOrNot is speaking in Silicon Valley on Thursday. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Here's my curriculum vitae. It's basically a summary of my education, work experience, publications, honors and awards. It's much like a resume, for a person who hopes to find work as an educator. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Halley expands on the Emotional Spa meme. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Allan Karl: "Where are the mind gyms?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Sunday, January 05, 2003. Sunday, January 05, 2003

Back in California, to a soaked living room (leaky roof, arrrgh), and just in time for the NY Giants vs the SF 49ers.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

HOLY SHIT HOW ABOUT THOSE NINERS! Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Great great game. In the end the Giants blew it. The final field goal from the 21 yard line (an easy distance for most teams) that should have won the game for NY was broken by a bad snap. But it was just third down. The holder could have fallen on the ball and they could have tried again. Instead -- panic, the clock ran out, game over.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Does Jeff Garcia, the 49ers QB, remind us of Joe Montana or Steve Young? In every way.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Andrew Orlowski has a story about Microsoft's cellphone. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I am so wiped. Tired to the bone, and emotionally drawn. I know what I need. A spa. But not the usual kind of spa, I want more than a body massage and a hot tub. I want to go to an Emotional Spa™. A place where they massage not just your muscles, but your ego. When you arrive you get a standing ovation. Lots of special rooms for different kinds of support and appreciation -- all for you! (Actually for me.) You don't have to lift a finger. Not a care in the world. Sign me up now. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

On this day four years ago, a Telnet server for Frontier. It's still there. Does it work? Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Saturday, January 04, 2003. Saturday, January 04, 2003

Steve Gillmor: "Opinionated, volatile, blunt, and disruptive, Dave Winer is an American original." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Halley: "So here's Lesson Two -- if you really want to be an Alpha Male, you've got to give." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Steve Zellers, a longtime friend who works at Apple, tells his MacBird story. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Ernie the Attorney: "I think in the next year we are going to see a bevy of specialty law blogs." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Charles Cooper: "Did you know you can use AIM on your cellphone?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Also: Shape Services, Nokia, PDAppsPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Apparently AOL has not been asleep at the wheel, just quiet about what they're developing in wireless instant messaging. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Robert Occhialini: I've been using a Danger Sidekick from T-Mobile for about a month. It's a phone, does AIM, email, Web browsing, and has a decent Web interface that you can use to enter data. I love it. It comes with an unlimited data package and is always connected. Downsides are no direct sync with PC and black-and-white screen." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Rob McKnight: "One thing to take note of is the growing number of these devices with built in or add-on cameras." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Adam reports on his Bit Torrent experiment. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

On this day two years ago I wrote about desktop websitesPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Just a random comment to say how much I'm enjoying reading two weblogs from Japan, one from Joi Ito, and the other from Professor Lessig. It's great to watch two minds blossom in a new space. Excellent. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: "Disaster recovery sites like this one operate as high-tech lifeboats for other companies that need a safe haven for their employees, or for electronic records in fires, floods or terrorist attacks." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Next gen cellphone Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Got a lot of email on this, the consensus appears to be Treo. Lots of people sing its praises. It's a cellphone and a great PDA. Ole Eichorn's comment was pretty concise.

Ole Eichorn: "I have a Treo 300, which is on the Sprint network. It is a Palm-based PDA, a decent phone, and has a real web browser built in (not one of those crummy WAP things). Plus you can get and send email via your desktop (same accounts, etc.) And for you, a qwerty keyboard. It is bigger than your current phone, but I traded in a Motorola Star-Tac for mine and I donít mind the larger size considering now I donít have to carry a PDA."

Bernie Goldbach: "If you want a qwerty keyboard for moblogging and don't mind if it comes attached to a 244g sharp-looking mobile phone, you want the Nokia Communicator."

Question -- do any of these devices connect up to AIM or Jabber? Radio and Frontier have support for both. Where is AOL in all the maneuvering about cellphones that connect up to computer networks? (The answer seems to be asleep at the wheel?) Answer: see above.


Permanent link to archive for Friday, January 03, 2003. Friday, January 03, 2003

Rogers Cadenhead says he's been puttering around with the MacBird source. Glad to hear it. Let me know if you have any questions. I might still be able to answer them. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Paul Boutin notes that James Ledbetter's confession hosted by the once august NY Times "ends with a mention of his upcoming book." I'm still appalled. The NY Times plays too loose. It's ridiculous that they let Ledbetter take a bath using their good name. It says they don't understand journalistic integrity. If it were medicine or law or Trent Lott he was covering, or Enron or WorldCom, I suspect they'd get it. Computers matter, our economy runs on computers. When a mass deception has the press colluding, en masse, that calls for a house-cleaning, not a shrugged shoulder. As Dan Gillmor might say, we should all agree that what Ledbetter and his ilk did was and still is pathetic and disgusting, period, end of discussion, no excuses, and no books about it either, certainly not books written by the perpetrators of the fraud, presumably masquerading as journalists. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Lessig: "If the Sonny Bono Act is unconstitutional, then Happy Birthday will be free!" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Ed Cone: "John Edwards is a video-ready candidate, pretty to look at and smooth of tongue." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Alan Reiter: "Well Dave, you can get a real qwerty keyboard on a cellular phone, but you'll need a new phone and new cellular provider and you'll have to put up with a larger device." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Ernie the Attorney: "In two years almost everyone who uses email in any fashion (students, professionals, teenagers, maybe even grandparents) will have one of these devices. The question is whether you will have one that is separate from your phone." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

MacBird Open Source Release: "There are other UI runtimes, some are even open source. MacBird is different because it's built for the designer. You create and edit MacBird 'cards' using a draw program with grouping and alignment." Originally released three years ago today. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named mbsmall.gifI spent about an hour trawling through the source for MacBird and came across a document that explains something called the Interactive Object Architecture for MacBird. It never went anywhere, but it's good. MacBird is a frustration to me. It seems it should have gone somewhere. Oh well, onward. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Brent Simmons who is now famous for NetNewsWire, an RSS reader for Mac OS X, wrote docs about MacBird back in 1996. They're still there on his site on Ranchero. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Ian Beatty sends a pointer to AquaMinds NoteTaker 2003, an outliner for Mac OS X. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Russell Beattie: "I am ruler of my blog roll." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Megnut: "It's no wonder we're seeing an increase in unemployment, people seem to have no idea how to apply for a job these days." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Susannah Breslin is looking for a weird weblog person (WWP) to speak at a conf in LA in Feb. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named sanyo.gifIn the last month or so I've become a serious cellphone user, and for the last 2.5 weeks, a serious cellphone user in NY, where you are not allowed to use a cellphone while driving unless you do it hands-free. Turns out it was a stroke of luck that my old phone crapped out, that forced me to get a new one and it has a speaker phone capability, so I've been able to use it while driving. That's cool. One thing led to another and then this realization. The form factor of a cellphone is no longer limited by the shape of a phone handset. Fewer and fewer people use them that way. More people plug in headsets into their phones. So why not make them just a teensy bit bigger and put a real qwerty keyboard on the darn thing and let me type into it like a human being.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Gary Turner: "I feel sure that if 15 years ago I was able to play my pre-illness dad a video of his later life he would have thanked me and then driven his car into a wall at high speed the day before he contracted meningitis." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Adam Curry is offering the first episode of his Dutch TV show via Gnutella. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Robert Occhialini: "At the risk of embarassing myself quite badly, I thought I would go ahead and post my New Year's Resolutions here."  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Nick Denton: "I'm looking for a writer for a new blog media title, covering online porn and erotica." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Evan Williams on AOL's weblogs: "We have firsthand knowledge that AOL has been looking at the space, with some interest, for a few months at least." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Halley Suitt, a woman, offers tips on becoming an alpha male. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

A picture named ellathumb.gifNY Times: "Copyright protection lasts only 50 years in European Union countries, compared with 95 years in the United States, even if the recordings were originally made and released in America. So recordings made in the early- to mid-1950's -- by figures like Maria Callas, Elvis Presley and Ella Fitzgerald -- are entering the public domain in Europe, opening the way for any European recording company to release albums that had been owned exclusively by particular labels." Permanent link to this item in the archive.


Permanent link to archive for Thursday, January 02, 2003. Thursday, January 02, 2003

CBS Marketwatch: AOL said ready to boost bloggingPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Simon Fell did a pingback client tool for Radio. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

An update on my father's health, belowPermanent link to this item in the archive.

William Brody: "If we allow insurers to use genetic data, many more individuals will be left without coverage because they will be deemed too high-risk to warrant insurance at affordable prices." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Read this op-ed by former Industry Standard editor James Ledbetter to be reminded how the business press excused themselves and still do now, for the abuse of trust of their readers during the dot-com boom. This guy is almost contrite, almost apologizes for his failure of ethics. We're offered every excuse, we're told he was angry with himself, and somehow that's enough, it's okay, he can go on being an editor at Time Europe, he can sell his book about the Industry Standard. This guy was certainly not a journalist when he was at the Standard, that's clear. Does he claim to be a journalist now? He wrote this piece now, and it ran in the NY Times. He says it would be wrong to blame business media alone, but that sidesteps the question. Would it be wrong to blame James Ledbetter. Imho, no it would not be wrong. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

BTW, it's disgusting that the Times let him use their space to try to clean his reputation. After all if it's okay with the Times, it must be okay? This calls for a disclaimer from the Times saying they don't sanction the antics Ledbetter describes, and it's not enough to later admit to them, something more is required. Journalism is not such a casual thing. A lawyer who admitted such an ethical vaccuum would be disbarred. To me journalism is just as high a calling. Perhaps not for the Times? Disappointed.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

NY Times: Professors Vie With Web for Class's AttentionPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Ross Mayfield: Blog Tribe Social Network MappingPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Karlin says there are far more than two Irish bloggers. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Don Park: "Sash is also slow, bloated, and bewildering." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Mitch Kapor update on the status of Chandler. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Danny O'Brien: "I often wondered what adventure Felsenstein was up to these days." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Wired's Vaporware list for 2002 is out. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Hey the DMOZ directory keeps forgetting about RSS 2.0. Maybe they should get a new hard disk or something. (It's not quite as bad as it seems. Google's version of the directory isn't updating from the source. It's been months since the directory updated. Further, the DMOZ version says formats like 0.90, 0.91, 0.92 are deprecated. Who decided that? What an ugly word. Hey they're good formats, I'm happy when we get support for any one of the older formats. I think the directory should list them in reverse-chronological order, and leave it at that.) Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Dad update Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I try to keep the public reports not too frequent, no need for you all to be on the roller coaster. Last time I reported, Dad was on the steep slope down the mountain, and picking up speed. It didn't look good. But somehow he rallied, found strength no one could believe he had, and he's back in the pink, talking, off the respirator, out of the hospital, in rehab, feeding himself, at times feisty, and most of his conversation makes sense.

Now of course I'm exhausted and so is my mom, maybe there's a rehab for family members who have been on the roller coaster, but I suspect not. It's so great to see him get better, and the rehab place seems great. Within an hour of his arrival they had him doing exercises, very modest ones, we know that this is the key to keeping his gains. Work the muscles, breathe deeply, eat a lot of nutritious food, and get a lot of support from people who love you. He's lost a lot of weight, but his spirit is strong. That's why he's here in 2003. At one point the doctor said my daddy would be lucky to see the new year. Well he made it.

Right now I'm very optimistic. I'm going to stay in NY for a couple of extra days, it seems these days are very important, and nothing is going to happen in Calif until Monday anyway.


Permanent link to archive for Wednesday, January 01, 2003. Wednesday, January 01, 2003

How was your rollover? Permanent link to this item in the archive.

It's January 1, time for new beginnings. Believe it or not I'm applying for a job in academia, so it's time to put together my curriculum vitae. It's a fancy name for a resume. Basically, the job I want to do is the one I have been doing, with some extras (like teaching), but not in the context of a commercial software company. UserLand has been getting along fine without me since early summer. And of course I remain the major shareholder in the company, so I'm very interested, and I help out whenever I can. But if it goes as I hope it will, you'll see a gradual separation. All the stuff that I write on the Web, Scripting News, DaveNet, the specs and discussion groups will stay independent, but the software -- Radio, Manila, Frontier, etc -- that's UserLand. As I've been talking with people about this, it's been hard for them to separate me from UserLand, but that's what I want to do. I'm going to get a new job with a new title, and it's going to be quite different from being the CEO of a commercial software company. It's time to set my life in a new direction. My health, quitting smoking, my father's illness, all have given me the chance to make a big change in lifestyle. Wish me luck! And as I do this corner-turn, in the spirit of weblogs, I will document as much as I possibly can, publicly. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jerry Garcia: "When I was in the hospital, if Iíd been able to choose my death, this is the one I would have chosen, the one that has an adventure attached to it." Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Business 2.0: "After creating a program that makes Linux as easy to use as Windows, Miguel de Icaza is trying to make it just as simple to produce open-source versions of thousands of new Windows applications. So why isn't Microsoft worried?" Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Jenny and her friends are bound to like this storyPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Penn State University is doing something with RSS.  Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Halley is feeling empowered today by a new concept, The Job Angel. Check it out I think she's onto something. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

I just realized that we now have two Irish tech bloggers, Sean McGrath and Karlin LillingtonPermanent link to this item in the archive.

Happy Birthday to Megnut, who is 31 today. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

Five years ago today I wrote one of the most challenging DaveNets ever. It got lots of people talking, and to this day it gets me lots of mail. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

The On This Day In feature gains a year and loses one too. The new year is the one that just ended, 2002. And 1997 isn't there anymore because there was no Scripting News on this day in 1997. On April 1, the list will fatten up, as it does every year, when 1997 reappears, and of course 2002 will still be there. That's how time works. It's very mathematical. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

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